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Posts for tag: Heartburn

By Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease, LLC
October 05, 2020
Category: Digestive Health
Foods That Help Combat HeartburnMost of us have dealt with a bout of heartburn before; however, there are many Americans that deal with frequent heartburn that makes it difficult to enjoy mealtimes. Whether your heartburn is the result of acid reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), you must see a gastroenterologist if you are experiencing heartburn multiple times a week.

If you’re dealing with heartburn, one of the first things your gastroenterologist will examine is your diet. While certain foods can exacerbate heartburn and make it worse, certain foods can improve and ease acid reflux symptoms. Some of these foods include:

Oatmeal

Foods that are high in fiber such as oatmeal aren’t just amazing for your digestive tract, they may also prevent heartburn from brewing in the first place. Plus, whole grain foods can help satiate your appetite for longer, which means that you are less likely to go for snacks and other foods that could cause a nasty bout of acid reflux. So, start your morning right with a hearty bowl of oatmeal. And perhaps you may even want to add a….

Banana

Just like vegetables, a banana is a low-acid and high alkaline fruit that is also great for the digestive tract. If you battle with heartburn, bananas can help prevent stomach acid production while also helping things run smoothly through the digestive system.

Ginger

Whether you prefer ginger sprinkled into your morning smoothie, a soothing cup of ginger tea or fresh ginger grated into your water, this magical vegetable reduces inflammation and can aid in preventing and treating heartburn as well as calm an upset stomach and ease nausea.

Leafy Greens and Veggies

Fibrous vegetables such as spinach, broccoli, potatoes, and asparagus are alkaline, which helps to keep stomach acid in check. This is also because these delicious and nutritious foods are low in sugar and fat, which means they are friends to those with heartburn.

Yogurt

We all know that yogurt has amazing probiotic properties, providing your gut with the good bacteria it needs to stay healthy and strong. Good bacteria can also improve how your immune system functions, staving off germs and infections, while also coating and easing stomach acid.

Whether you have questions about your current heartburn-friendly diet or you’re having trouble getting your acid reflux under control, a gastroenterologist will be able to provide you with proper long-term medication and lifestyle changes that can help.
By Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease, LLC
June 05, 2020
Category: GI Care
Tags: Heartburn  
HeartburnWhen the natural stomach acid produced during digestion reaches your esophagus, it causes what is known as Heartburn or Acid Reflux. It feels like stomach or chest pain, or possibly a burning sensation. You’ve most likely experienced this at some point in your life. It’s a common occurrence after eating very large meals or greasy foods. It’s only when you have heartburn all the time or every meal that you need to see a gastroenterologist.
 
Treatment for Mild Heartburn
Your gastroenterologist starts by focusing on your symptoms. These concentrate on prevention, with certain diet and lifestyle changes. You need to first start by evaluating what you eat. 
 
Avoid these foods if you suffer from heartburn:
  • Chocolate
  • Greasy and fatty foods
  • Mint
  • Spicy foods
  • Onions
  • Garlic
Antacids are over-the-counter stomach acid reducers that help when experiencing bouts of heartburn.
 
There are also risk factors for experiencing heartburn, including being overweight, smoking, pregnancy, and excessive alcohol intake.
 
Following certain guidelines is the ideal way to keep your heartburn at bay. These include eating smaller meals on a more frequent basis, avoiding lying down after eating, wearing loose clothing, and avoiding activities that involve bending down or lifting.
 
Heartburn as an Indicator of GERD
If heartburn is left to progress without intervention, it develops into gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). You need to stop severe heartburn complications in their tracks. Otherwise, they result in severe inflammation and ulceration of the esophagus, scarring, and Barrett's esophagus. Cancer becomes a possibility without the help of a gastroenterologist. 
 
Treatment for GERD 
Treatment is a mixture of the preventive measures listed above alongside pharmaceuticals. Your gastroenterologist may prescribe medications known as PPIs or H2 blockers. These work to stop the overproduction of acid in the stomach. Alginate drugs are another option. They create a barrier within the stomach that protects it from stomach acid. 
 
Antacids are the most popular and common over-the-counter treatment for heartburn. They provide a short-term reduction of stomach acidity. There are dozens of different brands and types of antacids. This includes formats like liquid, gels, and regular pills. 
 
Consider contacting a gastroenterologist if you experience throat problems like soreness, pain when swallowing, nauseous, wheezing, a persistent cough, and bad breath. These are other common symptoms of GERD. 
By Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease, LLC
February 19, 2020
Category: Gastroenterology
Tags: Heartburn  

Heartburn plagues you almost daily. The regurgitation, the burning in your esophagus and more need attention. If this describes your situation, see your board-certified gastroenterologists at Alaska Digestive & Liver Disease in Anchorage. Dr. Daryl McClendon, Dr. Jeffrey Molloy and Dr. Austin Nelson diagnose and treat heartburn to preserve your GI health and your well-being.

What is heartburn?

When stomach contents, including foods and acids, travel in reverse into the esophagus, your gastroenterologists at Alaska Digestive & Liver Disease in Anchorage say you have heartburn or acid reflux. Characterized by pain in the chest and problems with swallowing, heartburn is also called GERD (gastro-esophageal reflux disease) when its frequency increases.

Foods, unhealthy body weight, pregnancy and excessive alcohol consumption all contribute to acid reflux. Eating too much and too close to bedtime, stress, tight clothes and smoking increase the severity and number of episodes you have, too.

Managing heartburn

Unfortunately, your heartburn is more than uncomfortable. It can cause dangerous ulcerations in the esophagus which may lead to cancer. Chronic heartburn requires investigation by your gastroenterologist who will review your medical history and symptoms. Also, he may do an EGD or Upper GI Endoscopy which passes a lighted tube down the esophagus to look for ulcerations and areas which may require biopsy.

To manage symptoms, your doctor will formulate a care plan based on your test results and other factors. Treatment recommendations may include:

  • Weight loss
  • Sleeping on your side or with the head of your bed elevated
  • Not eating close to bedtime
  • Eating smaller and more frequent meals
  • Medications such as antacids (to neutralize stomach acid), Zantac or Prilosec (to limit acid production)
  • Wearing clothing which is loose-fitting at the waist
  • Limiting alcohol
  • Quitting all tobacco

Also, your doctor will encourage you to track your symptoms, including when they start, how long they last and what brings relief.

Learn more about heartburn

Don't ignore your painful GI symptoms. Take control of them, and feel better. For expert help, call Alaska Digestive & Liver Disease. Drs. McClendon, Molloy and Nelson are known for their high-quality and compassionate care. We have two offices to serve you: Anchorage and Eagle River. For a convenient appointment time, phone (907) 569-1333.

By Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease
March 26, 2019
Category: GI Care
Tags: Heartburn   Asthan   Ulcers   Stomach Cancer  

Your gastrointestinal health needs diligent care. If you suffer from heartburn (also called acid reflux or GERD), don't ignore the pain, burning sensation, difficulty swallowing, and pressure. Contact Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease in Anchorage or Eagle River. Dr. Chest PainBoisen, Dr. McClendon, and Dr. Molloy are board-certified in gastroenterology and internal medicine. They can help you manage this potentially damaging condition.

What is heartburn?

Heartburn is the nickname for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, the back-up of stomach contents and acid into the esophagus after a meal. Increasing in frequency with age and obesity, GERD causes considerable discomfort, a burning sensation in the area of the breastbone and mimics heart attack pain in intensity.

While many people choose to just live with heartburn and take over the counter medications for relief, your Anchorage gastroenterologists stress that no one should downplay or ignore reflux symptoms which last more than a week or so. The American College of Gastroenterology agrees, saying that repeated episodes of GERD may lead to:

  • Erosions, ulcers and strictures in the esophagus
  • Asthma-like symptoms (coughing most notably)
  • Persistent chest discomfort
  • Barrett's Esophagus, a pre-cancerous condition in which the cells lining the esophagus change to resemble those lining the stomach
  • Esophageal and stomach cancer

As such, always mention heartburn symptoms to your primary care physician who may recommend evaluation by the team at Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease.

Managing GERD

Drs. Molloy, McClendon and Boisen fully evaluate their patients regarding heartburn symptoms, asking about intensity, frequency and what may precipitate an attack. The gastroenterologist often advises physical examination via upper GI endoscopy (a lighted scope and video imaging) or video capsule endoscopy which sends imaging via a tiny camera which travels through the entire GI tract. These results will tell him the extent of your condition, show him any changes--cancerous or not--and help him tailor a care plan suited to your needs.

Common treatments for heartburn, include:

  • Limiting acidic and fatty foods
  • Losing weight and maintaining a healthy weight
  • Wearing loose clothing (particularly at belt level)
  • Elevating the head of the bed
  • Practicing good posture
  • Not eating for three hours before going to bed
  • Taking proton pump inhibitors, such as Prilosec, and H2 inhibitors, such as Zantac

Feel better and be healthier

Be well informed on your acid reflux, and allow the experts at Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease help. For a consultation with one of our gastroenterologists, please call for an appointment at either our Anchorage or Eagle River, AK, offices at (907) 569-1333.

By Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease
December 06, 2018
Category: Gastroenterology
Tags: Heartburn  

Got heartburn? Heartburn, also known as acid indigestion, is a form of indigestion felt as a burning pain in the chest. It's caused when stomach acid flows up into your esophagus. More than just a minor discomfort, acid indigestion can reduce quality of life. The following tips will help you rid yourself of heartburn.

1. Change your diet. Stay away from beverages and foods that commonly cause heartburn. A good way to work out what beverages and foods trigger your heartburn symptoms is to keep track of what you eat. Common offenders include tea, coffee, tomatoes, garlic, fatty foods, spicy foods, milk, chocolate and peppermint. 

2. Don't overeat. Overeating can trigger heartburn. Big meals put pressure on the muscle that helps keep stomach contents from backing up into the esophagus. The more food you eat, the longer it takes for your stomach to empty, which contributes to acid reflux. Try eating five small meals a day to keep reflux at bay.

3. Avoid alcohol. Alcohol can trigger heartburn. Alcohol can relax the sphincter muscle at the lower end of your esophagus, causing stomach acid to flow up into your esophagus If your aim is to unwind after a long day at work, try exercise, stretching, listening to soothing music, or deep breathing instead of drinking alcohol.

4. Lose weight. If you overeat, lose weight- but be sure to consult your doctor before starting a vigorous exercise program. The increased risk of heartburn is thought to be due to excess abdominal fat causing pressure on the stomach.

5. Stop smoking. Nicotine is a muscle relaxant. Nicotine can relax the sphincter muscle, causes acid from the stomach to leak upward into the esophagus. Nicotine gums, patches, and lozenges are healthier and safer than cigarettes, and they are less likely to give you heartburn. 

6. Contact your doctor. Your doctor may suggest antacids for occasional heartburn. Sometimes, more powerful prescription medications such as proton pump inhibitors or H2 blockers and are needed to treat chronic heartburn. When all else fails, surgery may be required to repair the LES.

Chronic heartburn can affect your daily activities and make life frustrating and miserable. Don't hesitate to contact a gastroenterologist about heartburn.

By Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease
September 17, 2018
Category: GI Care
Tags: Heartburn  

Heartburn--it's that uncomfortable, irritating pain in the center of your chest after you eat. Also called gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, heartburn affects people of all ages. When heartburn persists, your gastroenterologists in Anchorage and Eagle River, AK can Heartburnhelp. At Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease, Dr. Ronald Boisen, Dr. Daryl McClendon and Dr. Jeffrey Molloy understand heartburn and how best to prevent it and treat it.

Why heartburn happens

Maybe your Grandpa called it "backup," and he was right. GERD symptoms happen when stomach contents, including acid, back up into the food pipe, or esophagus.

Why does this occur? A weak esophageal sphincter, the gateway between the food pipe and the stomach, often is to blame as are:

  • A hiatal hernia, when part of the stomach intrudes into the opening in the breathing muscle, or diaphragm
  • Spicy, chocolaty, and greasy food choices which irritate the lining of the stomach and make it more active
  • Obesity
  • Clothes that are too tight at the waistline
  • Pregnancy
  • Smoking
  • Excessive alcohol use
  • Stress
  • Certain medications

What can you do?

Over the counter antacid medications often control heartburn symptoms. However, if symptoms persist beyond two weeks, say physicians at the Cleveland Clinic, see your gastroenterologist in Anchorage or Eagle River.

He may wish to inspect the lining of your esophagus and stomach with an outpatient procedure called an endoscopy. This lighted instrument helps the doctor uncover conditions such as Barrett's Esophagus, ulcers, and other issues which could be causing your heartburn symptoms.

A common care plan

Many heartburn patients respond well to simple lifestyle modifications such as:

  • Losing weight
  • Wearing clothes which fit properly at the waist
  • Stopping all tobacco
  • Limiting alcohol
  • Stopping food and beverages three hours before bedtime
  • Raising the head of the bed a few inches
  • Sleeping on the left side to alleviate pressure on the abdomen
  • Reducing stress through exercise
  • Taking prescribed proton pump inhibitors or H2 antagonists to reduce acid production in the stomach

Learn more

The American College of Gastroenterology says that at least 60 million Americans experience heartburn. If you're one of them, don't suffer. Contact Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease for an evaluation and help in managing your symptoms. We have two locations to serve you--one in Anchorage and one in Eagle River, AK. Use this number for an appointment at either office: (907) 569-1433. We look forward to seeing you!

By Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease
June 15, 2018
Category: Gastroenterology
Tags: Heartburn   GERD  

Do you find that most mealtimes end up being ruined by gnawing, nagging heartburn? While most people will experience heartburn at some point during their lifetime, if you are someone who suffers from this problem several times a week then you may just have a digestive disorder known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

 

What is GERD?

Whenever you eat food, it travels from the esophagus to the stomach. Once food enters the stomach, the stomach produces acid to break up the food. Of course, in healthy individuals the food travels from the stomach to the intestines; however, if you have GERD then the acid and food contents actually flow back up to the esophagus from the stomach, irritating the lining of the throat and causing a nasty case of heartburn.

 

What are the symptoms?

Heartburn is a classic symptom of GERD. Heartburn is a burning in the chest that also affects the lining of the throat. Heartburn sometimes produces an acidic or bitter taste in the mouth. Symptoms may get worse if you eat a big meal, consume something spicy or lie down immediately after eating.

 

How is GERD diagnosed?

In some situations a gastroenterologist may be able to determine that you have GERD based on the symptoms you describe and through a simple physical exam; however, sometimes a diagnostic test is required in order to determine whether your symptoms are truly caused by GERD or something else. An upper endoscopy is one common diagnostic procedure performed to check for signs of inflammation or damage to the lining of the esophagus, which are indicative of GERD.

 

What are my treatment options?

Your treatment plan will most likely consist of lifestyle modifications and medications.

 

Lifestyle modifications

If you are overweight or obese you may be at a higher risk for developing GERD. It’s important to lose that excess weight and to maintain a healthy weight to reduce your symptoms. Quit smoking if you are currently a smoker. Make sure to eat slowly and eat smaller meals. Don’t lie down immediately after eating and eat about three hours before going to bed.

 

Also, there are certain foods that can trigger heartburn symptoms including chocolate, caffeine, alcohol, tomato sauce, garlic, or fatty and spicy foods. Limit or avoid any of these foods if they are known to cause you heartburn.

 

Medication

Those with milder symptoms may be able to use an over-the-counter antacid or medication to manage their symptoms; however, if symptoms are moderate-to-severe, or if you have damage to the lining of the esophagus, then you’ll need a stronger medication to reduce or even prevent the production of stomach acid until the damage has healed.

 

If you deal with heartburn on a regular basis or can’t seem to get heartburn under control it’s important that you turn to a GI doctor who can help you find the proper treatment option to prevent digestive complications and to make mealtimes more enjoyable again.

By Alaska Digestive and Liver Disease
May 15, 2018
Category: Gastroenterology
Tags: Heartburn  

You would love to just be able to sit down and enjoy a meal, but you know that not long afterward you are going to be dealing with the burning, Heartburngnawing pain in your stomach caused by heartburn. No matter if this is something that you have been facing for a while or this is a new issue you are dealing with, it’s important that you have a gastroenterologist that can help you figure out what’s going on.

It’s important to understand that heartburn isn’t a condition but a symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), in which stomach acid travels back up through the esophagus causing burning and irritation of the esophageal lining.

So, what are the leading culprits of heartburn? There are quite a few things that could cause this issue including:

  • Certain foods or drinks: Everything from alcohol and caffeine to acidic and spicy foods can exacerbate heartburn symptoms. Diets that are high in fatty or fried foods can also make heartburn worse.

  • Medications: There are certain over-the-counter medications that can also cause heartburn to flare-up.

  • Smoking: Smoking cigarettes can actually affect how the lower esophageal sphincter functions, allowing stomach acid to travel back through the esophagus.

  • A hiatal hernia: A condition in which some of the stomach protrudes into the chest.

  • Pregnancy: Pressure placed on the abdomen during pregnancy could increase your chances of heartburn.

  • Obesity: Having any additional pressure placed on the abdomen, which is common if you are overweight or obese, can bring on a nasty bout of heartburn.

Fortunately, there are many ways in which to reduce the severity and frequency of heartburn. Turning to a GI specialist is the best approach, as they can provide you with a variety of lifestyle changes and medications based on your symptoms, current health, lifestyle, and how much damage has already taken place within the esophagus.

From there, they will create a tailored treatment plan with a medication that will either greatly lessen the amount of acid the stomach produces or temporarily block stomach acid from being produced to help promote healing within the esophagus.

Lifestyle changes may include eating smaller meals, not eating right before bedtime, avoiding exacerbating foods or drinks, losing excess weight, and quitting smoking.

Don’t let heartburn make you dread sitting down to enjoy your favorite meals. There are so many ways in which to get your heartburn symptoms under control. If you are having trouble finding the right treatment option for you don’t hesitate to turn to a gastroenterologist for guidance and treatment.